Healthy Heart Exercise Tips That Will Change Your Life

We want a long, prosperous and healthy life. Unfortunately due to the toll of busy working life and hardly any time left for ourselves, some may develop diseases. Musculoskeletal pain, heart disease and diabetes have all become a common friend in the time that we are now living in.Here are some tips of the kind of exercise that can be included in your workout routine in order to achieve optimal health.

ENDURANCE

  • Brisk walking
  • Biking
  • Running/jogging
  • Swimming
  • Dancing
  • Climbing stairs at work
  • Sports such as tennis, basketball etc

STRENGTH

Simple, weight-bearing exercises that use free weights, machines or your own body’s resistance are the focus. A well-rounded strength-training program provides the following benefits:

  • Increased strength of bones, muscles and connective tissue
  • Lower risk of injury
  • Increased muscle mass (makes it easier for your body to burn calories)
  • Better quality of life

BALANCE

Having good balance is important for many activities we do every day such as walking, and it also can help prevent falls. They also benefit obese people since weight is not always distributed evenly throughout the body.

Balance exercises can be done every day or as often as you like. Preferably, older adults at risk of falls should do balance training 3 or more days a week. Try these balance exercises:

  • See how long you can stand on one foot or try holding for 10 seconds on each side
  • Walk heel to toe for 20 steps
  • Walk normally in as straight a line as you can or in tandem walking
  • Yoga and Tai Chi

FLEXIBILITY

These exercises stretch your muscle and help your body to stay flexible. Being flexible gives you more freedom of movement for other exercise as well as for your everyday activities.

The best time to do flexibility training is when your muscles are already warm so they can stretch without tightness or pain. It’s good to do stretching exercise 3 to 5 times during each session.

Written by: Dr. Shashini Asokumaran

Source: American Heart Association, Rehabilitation Medicine